All Shall Love Me and Rejoice


Joely-Richardson-stars-as-Young-Queen-Elizabeth-I-in-AnonymousI am a lion.

You cannot deny my ferocity.

I am a scholar.

You will not deny my mind and my prowess.

I am a general

You cannot but praise my warrior heart and admit my kingly courage.

I am a prince.

You cannot deny my father’s blood, sound, and fury.

I am a woman.

My guile and cunning will circumvent yours every time.

I am a serpent.

I know the poison that sits in and pervades the hearts of those in my court and will prove mine more deadly.

I am a savior.

I bring light and freedom to the lives of my people. I leave men’s hearts and souls to them and to God.

But those hearts shall love me, shall revere me, shall fight for me.

I have fought for my place, I have outlived those who would deny me, I have rid the world of those who would supplant me.

I know Who I am.

I am a Queen.

I am The Queen.

 

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Author’s Note: This is the fourth piece in a series inspired by the ladies of the Tudor dynasty. The first, “A Smile for a Kiss”, was inspired by Mary Tudor, eldest daughter of Henry VIII, who would become Queen Mary. The second, “Actions for a Lifetime (Love Me as a Verb)”, was inspired by the genteel Anne of Cleves, short time wife of King Harry (and many say the luckiest one). The third, “Will You Hear Me?”, was inspired by that lion of a woman, Catherine of Aragon, daughter of Isabella and Ferdinand of Spain, who refused to be put away quietly, to recant her position as Henry VII’s “true wife”, or to give away her title as Queen and disinherit their daughter. 

This, the final piece in my Tudor Ladies Series, is written from the viewpoint of Elizabeth I, the final member of the Tudor Dynasty. Once declared a bastard, she outlived all of those who would deny, disinherit, and decry her, eventually ascending the throne. Titled the Virgin Queen for her refusal to marry, she ushered in an era of learning, art, and ceiling shattering in what is now known as the Golden Age of England.

 

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Will You Hear Me?


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I stand like marble: sculpted, chiseled, and shaped from birth.

A stately form, grace running through me like veins of gold.

I am a Queen, born and bred,

Maintained by my own strength of will and force of destiny.

However, I speak not from authority, but from love, from devotion, and from hope.

Will you hear me?

I debase myself to ask, to plead, to beg.

I throw myself upon my knees, appealing to vain mercy.

Will you hear my words? Hear my heart, my weeping soul?

I will willingly do all of these but one.

I will not deny.

I will not deny myself. I will not deny my place.

I will not deny my royalty. I will not deny my crown.

I will not deny my daughter her place and pride.

I will cry from palace to hovel, from rooftop to grave.

I will shake the foundations of my royal legacy, from the Tower to the Alhambra,

To the roots of Heaven itself.

I will not deny who I am, whom I shall ever be!

Will you hear me?

Yes. You will hear me, and you will not forget.

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Author’s Note: This is the third piece in a series inspired by the ladies of the Tudor dynasty. The first, “A Smile for a Kiss”, was inspired by Mary Tudor, eldest daughter of Henry VIII, who would become Queen Mary. The second, “Actions for a Lifetime (Love Me as a Verb)”, was inspired by the genteel Anne of Cleves, short time wife of King Harry (and many say the luckiest one).

This newest piece is inspired by that lion of a woman, Catherine of Aragon, daughter of Isabella and Ferdinand of Spain, firstly wife to Arthur Tudor and then wife to Henry Tudor, who would become Henry VIII and create her Queen of England. All throughout Henry’s quest to divorce her after sixteen years of marriage, to put her away in disgrace and denial, Catherine refused to cooperate. She refused to be put away quietly, to recant her position as his “true wife”, or to give away her title as Queen and disinherit their daughter. She made sure her voice was heard, appealing to Henry himself in open court, and then sweeping from the proceedings with all the dignity and authority that she had spent her entire life holding in her right hand. Eventually, Henry went to great lengths to get what he wanted, but never once did Catherine capitulate and deny who she was.